Tales, Tidbits and Tributes

Our Stories


Archived Stories:
An eBay Adventure
Thomas Munson(1) the Soldier
Alice Estalla (Orser) Munson and Paul
Aunt Ella’s Travels

An eBay Adventure

It started in late April 2009 with an e-mail message from Nancy K. Munson, Esq., our TMF Legal Officer. Her brother, Lee Munson, had noticed an E-bay listing for an invitation to the 1887 New Haven reunion of Munsons. Nancy K. wondered if anyone was interested in acquiring it for the purpose of adding it to the TMF archive at the New Haven Museum and Library. We immediately made our maiden voyage into the world of cyper-yardsales – and located the item fairly easily!

Thomas Munson(1) the Soldier

Mayflower by Nathaniel Philbrick is a recent New York Times best selling book.  It lays out the first fifty years of Plymouth and other New England colonies and devotes much effort to describing the relations of the colonists and the native Indians leading up to and through King Philip’s War (1675-76).  This history allows Thomas1 Munson descendents to put the facts of his life as gathered by Myron Munson in Volume I of the The Munson Record into a broader historical context and to flesh out a little more of the character and background of the man.(Continue Here)

Alice Estella (Orser) Munson and Paul

My mother, Vincent Munson Ivers, confided in me that her father, Lewis S. Munson, had had an eye for the ladies. As owner and manager of a dry goods and grocery store, he must have been in a position to meet and converse regularly on a daily basis with the women of the town. A large, well-built man, with dark, expressive eyes, he was not only physically attractive but also held the position of a successful businessman in the small Iowa town of Washta. (Continue Here)

Aunt Ella’s Travels

At 9 P.M. prompt Friday, July 20th., 1900 the steamer Mikahala left Honolulu or the Leper Settlement on Molokai. On board were 170 passengers, out of whom were members of the Board of Health, newspaper men and women, nurses, and medical people, and about 120 or more Hawaiians on a visit to their relatives and friends. It is the custom of the Board of Health to visit Molakai twice a year, but owing to the Plague in the early part of the year, they were unable to go so a year has elapsed since the last visit was made. The steamer was crowded to its utmost capacity and hundreds were obliged to be refused permission to visit their friends. Every precaution was taken so that none but those whose names were called and had been given permission to go, were allowed to board the steamer and this was done by roll call. Several Hawaiian women boarded the steamer in response to the names of others who were not on hand at roll call, but they were found out upon arrival at Molokai and after being detained on board ship all morning, were finally permitted to land and see their friends.(Continue Here)